Culture is key and your responsibility

By Carole Burman, MAD-HR

We all know that responsibility comes in many forms for today’s business leader. From legal obligations to health and safety necessities, there’s so many requirements upon the shoulders of the ambitious and determined entrepreneur.

Central to all these business components, and the ability for them to be smooth and successful, is the existence of a clearly considered workplace culture. That is the behaviours and beliefs that exist within the business’s structure. The attitudes and interactions which sit at the core of your corporate existence, making you unique, and conveying a personality which attracts both customers and workforce alike.

As a business leader, ask yourself ‘do you take daily responsibility for the values, behaviours and attitudes which your company eats, sleeps and breathes?’ If the answer is anything other than a resounding ‘yes’ then perhaps it’s time you did…

Remember it will be these elements which ensure a consistency within the organisation, and an ethos which drives all employees to work together, for the same goals and with the same motivation and enthusiasm.

Businesses which embrace and adopt a clear corporate culture prove time and time again how much more effective they are at recruitment and retention. Their defined values consistently inspire talented individuals to want to join.

It’s these companies…

… which build better internal relationships and radiate these into their customer processes.

… which are more productive, more respected, and more influential in their sectors.

… who generate a higher level of employee happiness (and mental wellbeing) and overall job satisfaction.

That’s not to say that the responsibility of creating this company culture is without challenge and effort on the part of a business owner or leader – but trust me, it’s one that is so very worthwhile.

Here are my five key tips for taking responsibility as a leader, and forming a rewarding corporate culture:

1. Be open to opinion. You can’t create a culture without taking on board the opinions of all those who’ll be fundamental to that culture. Open the forum for discussion. Let staff and colleagues play a part.

2. Be constructively envious. It’s okay – and in fact, important – to look at what other companies do well by way of their own culture. Explore what others do and see how you could emulate aspects of that.

3. Although defined from the outset, recognise it’s also evolving. A culture is a bit like a business plan. It needs to be formed (it doesn’t just happen!), but it should be agile and evolutionary. Allow it to change and develop as you and your business does.

4. Ensure it’s understood from Day One. It’s not good enough to expect new employees just to ‘learn’ a culture as they go. Think about creating a ‘culture book’ just as you would brand guidelines.

5. Reward and appraise. Be sure to keep the commitment to that culture going, by staying aware of who among your team is a true ambassador. Rewarding and appraising regularly will help ensure you’re running with a cultural map for your business which is really a good fit.

Carole Burman is the Founder and Managing Director of MAD-HR. For more information contact: T: 01473 360160
E: hello@mad-hr.co.uk or visit mad-hr.co.uk Twitter:  @wearemadhr